Viewing your world in terms of Balance. By David I.J. Somers. Traditional Industrial Ecologist. ©19/2/2013.

The basis for studying the nature of balance.
The human mind views its surroundings in relative quantities related to its own circumstances, rather than absolute terms. Using money as an example: A million pounds is a large amount of money to the average wage earner, but loose change to a billionaire. So the average house is cheap to the billionaire and expensive to the average wage earner. Both the million pounds and the average house are perceived differently by different observers.
The technique of using balance to assess the state of things was pioneered in the Eastern medicine traditions before the technology we use today was even imagined, some 5000 years ago. The physician would begin with a picture of a person in optimum health in his mind. He would then examine the patient and take note of the differences between optimum health and his patient. The basic list is as follows:

Vitality: Young or old, manic or lethargic, happy or sad.
Temperature: Too hot or too cold.
Moisture: Too wet or too dry.
Circulation: Too much or too little.
Nervous tension: Tense or relaxed.
Assimilation of nutrients: Malnourished or overweight.
Elimination of waste: Overloaded or coping.

Because in the East there is the tradition of the yin and yang masculine and feminine energy then another layer applies to assessing balance. So the concept of balance is qualified by having each factor assigned two qualities. If for instance something was too hot this could be for two reasons as temperature was to the Eastern mind a combination of hot and cold. If a patient was hot the cause would be either too much heat or not enough cold. This observation led to needing false heat and false cold to correctly assess components of a balance. Needless to say this concept is rather alien to the Western mind and leaves the uneducated, extremely confused!!
When I learnt this approach to assessing things I thought it was the greatest thing since sliced bread. And my modest contribution was to decide that this was not just applicable to organisms, but also applicable to organisations, so I called myself a Traditional Industrial Ecologist.
I will now write the same list and apply it to an organisation.

Vitality: Young or old, manic or lethargic, happy or sad. The energy or atmosphere in the business.
Temperature: Too hot or too cold. Staff are too friendly or too remote.
Moisture: Too wet or too dry. Staff are over helpful or have a take it or leave it attitude.
Circulation: Too much or too little.
Are the resources needed to run the organisation available in the right place and at the right time?
Nervous tension: Tense or relaxed.
Are messages flowing up and down the chain of command easily, so that staff are aware of what is needed, and management facilitate these requirements.
Assimilation of nutrients: Malnourished or overweight.
Are training and equipment of the right capacity to service the needs of the business?
Elimination of waste: Overloaded or coping.
Are the systems and equipment fit for purpose, or are outdated processes and equipment causing blockages to good operation of the business?
Assessing balances.
If you go through this list for where you work, don’t bother with the Yin and Yang bit until you are comfortable with the basic seven topics on the list, you will find that this methodology lets you view your surroundings in a new way.
Enjoy, but be careful, because what you see will not be visible to others, unless they know how to look in the way you did. So do not push until others are ready to move.